Design & Practice Rebrands Olin Paper by Antalis

Amsterdam studio Design & Practice creates a new brand identity for OLIN, a premium uncoated paper range by Antalis.

The creative people of Amsterdam-based studio Design & Practice just sent over their recent rebrand for Olin paper by the global paper distributor Antalis. By repositioning this premium paper range with the goal to speak directly to designers and inspiring them, the new brand identity brings to life the commitment of Olin paper to the creative community.

Studio Design & Practice analyzed the existing brand to get a thorough understanding of the market and audience. They came up with a new brand identity that has been designed with a strong focus on the international creative community. It is based on a design that acts like a desirable canvas to inspire ideas and bring to life creative dreams.

Below you can see a few images of the project. For more, please have a look at the website of studio Design & Practice.

  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis
  • Amsterdam studio Design & Practice rebrands Olin paper by Antalis

All images © by Design & Practice. Do not hesitate to browse through our Graphic Design and Branding categories to find more inspiring work.

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The post Design & Practice Rebrands Olin Paper by Antalis appeared first on WE AND THE COLOR.


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“Extraction” by Photographer Michal Łuczak


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“Experimental Relationship” by Photographer Pixy Liao


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Dream States Illustration Series by Sam Chivers

Dream States, a series of four loosely interconnected illustrations.

Sam Chivers is a UK-based illustrator who’s working for major clients such as Adobe, Playstation, New Scientist, The Economist,GQ, Wired, Washington Post, Telegraph Magazine, NoBrow, Easyjet, Hoheluft Magazin, New Republic, Samsung, and others.

Sam Chivers just published ‘Dream States’, a series of four loosely interconnected illustrations. He was working on them between different commercial projects. These illustrations were originally made for a solo exhibition, but it was canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Below you can see all four pieces. For more, just visit Sam Chivers’ website or follow this talented illustrator on Behance and Instagram.

Dream States illustration series by Sam Chivers.
Dream States illustration series by Sam Chivers.
Dream States illustration series by Sam Chivers.
Dream States illustration series by Sam Chivers.

All images © by Sam Chivers. You can find more inspiring work in our Illustration category.

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Best 2D & 3D Infographics — Fully Customizable

Available for download as individual sets on adobe Stock, these high-quality 2D and 3D infographics are fully customizable.

Created by Adobe Stock contributor @kubko, this amazing collection of infographics includes plenty of different styles. Whether 2D or 3D, you can choose between a great variety of graphics including pie charts, circle charts, column graphs, arrows, lines, etc. Thanks to the use of vector graphics, all of these infographics are fully customizable.

Please note, to edit these vector graphics you need professional graphic design software such as Adobe Illustrator. You can get the latest version from the Adobe Creative Cloud website, just have a look here. Below you can see only a small selection of 2D and 3D infographics. Just click on the following link to see the full collection.

2D and 3D Infographics as fully editable vector graphics.
These 2D and 3D infographics are available as fully editable vector graphics here.

You can find more recommended design assets in our popular Templates category. The section includes a wide range of high-quality products from the best graphic design resources.

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The post Best 2D & 3D Infographics — Fully Customizable appeared first on WE AND THE COLOR.


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5 Great Tips for Mobile-Friendly Web Design

Mobile-first: learn how to create a mobile-friendly website.

It’s no secret that more and more website traffic is coming from mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. With great certainty, we can say that this trend will continue to rise rapidly. Therefore, today’s websites should be optimized for mobile devices in particular. Gone are the days when mobile websites were just an additional feature to the desktop version. A mobile-friendly website offers users a fast-loading and easy-to-use interface on any mobile device. In addition, it is also an important ranking feature for search engines like Google. Websites that fail to deliver a decent strategy for high-quality mobile experience risk falling behind their competitors. Don’t worry, we’ve put together 5 great tips on how to create a mobile-friendly website.

1. Optimize your website even for the thickest thumbs.

15 Mobile Device Screen Illustrations by Maxim Basinski
Mobile-friendly web design: these 15 mobile device screen illustrations by Maxim Basinski are available here.

Especially on smartphones, most users use their thumbs to navigate through your website. These interactions include scrolling, swiping, clicking, or entering text. As the touchscreen will not respond if parts of the thumb are not touching the button, web designers should use very large shapes when creating buttons. The position of all interactive elements is also very important. Typically, smartphones are held in the lower area while the thumb is placed somewhere in the middle. That’s why the ideal interaction zone is roughly in the middle of the screen.

2. Keep navigations short and simple.

Navigation UI Kit by Hoang pts
This navigation UI it by Hoang pts is available here.

While most desktop websites have a full navigation bar with multiple main and sub-menus in the header, it has become a common standard for mobile websites to include them all within one recognizable icon. Depending on how complex a menu is, each menu can have additional submenus. If a user clicks on one of these submenus, it is best to replace the existing menu with the new list in order to keep it short and clear. Sidebars are usually used for mobile menus, which slide out and overlay parts of the screen.

3. Optimize your website for a vertical view.

Neumorphic soft UI kit for Adobe Photoshop and Sketch
This neumorphic soft UI kit for Adobe Photoshop and Sketch by Delightful Design is available here.

Most users prefer to hold their smartphone or tablet upright while surfing the internet. The limited screen width is perfect for single-column layouts, which means: most website elements are placed sequentially from top to bottom. Smaller elements such as icons, graphics, or photos can be presented in a grid. Especially picture carousels can loosen up vertical scrolling by swiping horizontally. In addition, you should use visual sections for grouping similar information together so that the user can understand the purpose of each section immediately. Different background colors help separate these sections from each other.

4. Font size totally matters.

Helvetica® Now by Monotype is well suited for web design
Helvetica® Now by Monotype is well suited for web design. You can purchase this font family here.

Make sure the font size is adequate. Google recommends a font size of 16 as a base, which is defined in CSS pixels. If you use a responsive mobile website, you have a big advantage: with the viewport tag, pixels are displayed independently of the respective output device. In addition, it is important that you don’t use too many different fonts. The more uniform a typeface is, the easier it is for users to read texts on small screens.

5. Think mobile-first.

Mobile version of an architecture and interior studio website designed by Alexander Baril.
Mobile version of an architecture and interior studio website designed by Alexander Baril. You can see more here.

Since more people are surfing on mobile devices than on desktop devices, the mobile website has become more important than the desktop version. In the past, the desktop was always optimized first and the mobile version came second. This has now completely changed. With mobile-first, simplicity and user-friendliness are the key features right from the start of any web design project. That doesn’t necessarily mean that the desktop version always has to be minimalist with just a few functions. The more simple mobile version can serve as a basis for the desktop version because it’s easier to extend a simple design than to simplify a complex layout.


These were our 5 tips for mobile-friendly web design. Of course, that’s not all you need to consider, but these 5 tips should at least be a good start. For those of you looking for more website inspiration, feel free to browse through our popular Web Design category. The section also includes a range of premium website themes, templates, and web elements.

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A New Timelapse Tool Reveals How Much Humans Have Altered Earth’s Landscape Since 1984



Venture back to the sights of 1984 with Google Earth’s new timelapse tool. Released just in time for Earth Day, the addition reveals our collective mark on the planet during the last three decades and provides visual evidence of urban sprawl and the devastating effects of deforestation, mining, and agricultural growth in both 2- and 3-D. For those interested in checking out some of the most profoundly impacted areas, Google released a curated selection of videos that are categorized by theme and location, from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to Jirau Dam, Brazil to the Tucker And Whitehall Glaciers in Antarctica. (via Uncrate)

 


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Urban Centers Undergo ‘Guerilla Greening’ in GIFs that Reimagine Cities with Lush Vegetation

Fleet Street in London

The team over at WATG reenvisions some of the most iconic corridors in major cities in what the global design firm aptly describes as “guerilla greening.” Through a series of GIFs, streets in London, New York City, and Honolulu are transformed into lush, garden-like enclaves teeming with trees, new landscaping, and thick vegetation wrapping around the existing architecture. WAFT poured years of research into the short animations, which visualize practical and viable adjustments that would improve air quality, promote bicycle and pedestrian traffic, and make the traditionally concrete-and-brick locales more ecologically diverse.

Read more about the ongoing project on the firm’s site, and keep an eye out for future transformations on Twitter and Instagram. (via Core77)

 

London

Flatiron in New York City

Kalakaua Avenue in Honolulu


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350 Layers of Coiled Clay Form an Organic Low-Carbon Home Made Through 3D-Printing

All images © WASP

Last summer, The New York Times Magazine published a series of articles declaring that climate migration—a global exodus that’s predicted to displace between 50 and 300 million people worldwide—has begun. As more regions surrounding the equator become uninhabitable due to rising temperatures, crop losses, and disasters, entire populations will be forced to relocate to regions with more stable environments and economies. This impending movement coupled with an ongoing lack of affordable housing has sparked a wave of conversation about how best to remedy the looming crisis.

As a partial antidote, a Bologna-based studio, Mario Cucinella Architects, teamed up with the 3D-printing company WASP to design a low-carbon home that’s easily and quickly reproduced. Called “Tecla,” the prototype is a pair of sloping domes that can be built in only 200 hours using an average of six kilowatts of energy. It’s made of 350 layers of coiled clay, which is sourced from a nearby river, that serves as thermal insulation for the earthen structure complete with a living area, kitchen, and sleeping quarters. Two skylights embedded in the roof of the 4.2-meter-tall domes allow light to enter the 60-square-meter space.

A short video from WASP documents the construction technique in Massa Lombarda, which involves two synchronized printing arms that glide back and forth to layer the walls. Producing almost no waste, the process is adaptable to other raw materials, making it a viable option for housing beyond the Italian region.

Find a larger collection of Mario Cucinella Architects’ and WASP’s climate-focused projects and looks into their processes on Instagram. You also might enjoy this 3D-printed home by Rael San Fratello. (via Dezeen)

 




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A Very Alliterative and Repetitive Absurd French Phrase In Which Almost All the Words Sound the Same

French comedian Loïc Suberville quite amusingly made fun of his native language, taking the absurd English sentence “A green worm pours a glass towards a glassmaker around 8 PM” and translated it into French. The resulting phrased is very alliterative, assonant, and repetitive “Un ver vert verse un verre vers un verrier vers vignt heures”.

French Alliterative Phrase Using Ver Sound

For those not familiar with the French language, the pronunciation of most of the words in this odd phrase sound exactly the same. Suberville has been continuing the series with a few more examples.

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