Musician Performs the Theme to ‘Interstellar’ on an Underwater Pipe Organ Known as a Hydraulophone

Musician James Hancock performed the theme to “Interstellar” on a 12-jet hydraulophone, an woodwind-style instrument that is also known as an underwater pipe organ. The instrument was invented by the “father of wearable computing” Steve Mann at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics at Stanford University and uses jets to create different tones as the water is temporarily blocked from the soundhole.

Because the sound is produced by the medium that’s in direct contact with your fingers (the water), you can exert alot of subtle control over shaping and sculpting the sound. You can play chords on hydraulophone, and you can separately sculpt and shape each note in the chord, and do this continuously while the note is sounding.

The hydraulophone can also accommodate more than one player at a time. Here are a pair of players performing “House of the Rising Sun” by The Animals.

via Boing Boing

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post Musician Performs the Theme to ‘Interstellar’ on an Underwater Pipe Organ Known as a Hydraulophone first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

Booooooom BINGO #2 Sponsored by Wacom


Go to Source

A Heartfelt Tribute to the Role of Phone Booths in Films

Luís Azevedo and Jake Cunningham of Little White Lies offer a heartfelt tribute to the public phone booth, noting how they played a big role within many a film.

The phone booth was used as a center of momentary respite, a focused location, a vehicle for transportation, a place to change, or an inescapable trap to further the plot. Yet, as technology marches forward, the public phone booth no longer makes sense. And while it is an archaic relic of the past, this symbol of bygone years still deserves a proper send-off nonetheless.

…a public payphone can be called on for a small gag or a major plot point. But as movies and technology evolve, the phone booth is being left behind. …The phone booth is a location for metamorphosis. Without one, Superman is just Clark Kent. In a world without them, Edward Norton never becomes Brad Pitt, and the Rocket Man never comes out of the closet.

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post A Heartfelt Tribute to the Role of Phone Booths in Films first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

Disconcerting 3D Graffiti of an Ambiguous Necker Cube

Artist Jack Bowers created an incredible optical illusion with a 3D mural of a Necker Cube, an ambiguous drawing that appears to change shape depending upon the viewing perspective. Bowers’ work ranked seventh out of ten in the 2019 Optical Illusion Contest.

This video asserts that we must question our assumptions about perspective. The Renaissance helped us understand how we see 3-D distance visually, and today’s science confirms that there is more to the story.

via Nag on the Lake

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post Disconcerting 3D Graffiti of an Ambiguous Necker Cube first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

An Electromechanical Lithophone That Plays Individual Notes in the Round Performs ‘You Can Call Me Al’

During the 2016 Cheltenham Music Festival in England, audio researcher Jay Harrison set up his bespoke Electromechanical Lithophone to play a pitch perfect individual note rendition of the Paul Simon song, “You Can Call Me Al” and the ELO song “Mr. Blue Sky”.

Electromechanical Lithophone performing Paul Simon’s “You Can Call Me Al”… performing ELO’s “Mr. Blue Sky” at the Parabola Arts Centre as part of Cheltenham Music Festival 2016.

Harrison created this incredible sound machine for his dissertation during his Creative Music Technology degree course at Staffordshire University.

Bespoke Electromechanical Instrument built as part of a dissertation undertaken on the Creative Music Technology degree course at Staffordshire University. …The audience is invited to step inside an enclosure of 24 tone bars crafted from North Welsh Green Slate; the bars are arranged in a large circle and mounted on modules that enable autonomous musical performance.

via The Awesomer

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post An Electromechanical Lithophone That Plays Individual Notes in the Round Performs ‘You Can Call Me Al’ first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

Japanese Food Artist Drapes Comfy Egg Blankets Over Adorably Sleeping Animals Made of Rice

Japanese food artist Koh Ikeda creates soft, comfy egg blankets that he drapes over adorably sleeping animals that he made out of rice. Ikeda likes to have fun with food and seeks to please children (and grown ups) with his whimsical creations.

(translated) Children’s smiles and food are the sources of my activity. For good health! Happily! Delicious! The motto is the food you want to cook.

@kohcooking

????????????

? ??????? – ?????????

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post Japanese Food Artist Drapes Comfy Egg Blankets Over Adorably Sleeping Animals Made of Rice first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

Under UV Light, Platypuses Radiate a Fluorescent Green-Blue Hue—But Scientists Aren’t Sure Why

From left: visible light, ultraviolet light, and yellow-filtered UV light. Photo by Jonathan Martin

The platypus has puzzled researchers for centuries. From its venom-filled spurs, milk-secreting skin, and ability to eat a quarter of its body weight every day, the egg-laying mammal even had European zoologists believing it was a hoax well throughout the 19th Century.

A recent study published in the journal Mammalia adds to the duck-billed creature’s lengthy list of peculiarities. Apparently, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, the platypus’s dull, brown coat glows. The discovery happened after Jonathan Martin, an associate professor of forestry at Wisconsin’s Northland College, shined a UV flashlight on a flying squirrel in his backyard, which he found emitted a candy-colored pink hue. He then joined a few colleagues to visit Chicago’s Field Museum, where they replicated the process on the institution’s platypus collection, revealing the animals’ bright green and purple coat.

According to one study, the fluorescent substances are found embedded within mammals’ hair follicles, although scientists aren’t sure why. Sensory biologist Sönke Johnsen told The New York Times that “just finding fluorescence doesn’t mean it has any particular purpose.” Similar radiating colors exist in coral reefs and sea turtles, among other organisms, although the phenomena are less common in mammals.

Overall, the discovery has prompted further questions about whether the platypus can see UV light—most humans cannot, except for on certain items like white T-shirts—and even more interest in what we’ll discover about the curious creature next.


Go to Source

Performer Perfectly Personifies a NYC Subway Rat

Performer Jonothon Lyons hilariously dresses up like a giant rodent named Buddy and scurries around New York City streets acting like a typical subway rat. This means sniffing around food (particularly pizza), creeping up upon and scaring unsuspecting people, riding escalators, and climbing onto bridges, garbage pails, and subway tracks.

Lyons is an extremely accomplished actor, singer, and performer, who became Buddy the Rat to showcase his physical performance ability.

Jonothon Lyons is an Interdisciplinary Artist based in New York City. Performance credits include Blue Man Group, Sleep No More, Off the Main Road (Williamstown Theater Festival), Moisés Kaufman’s El Gato con Botas, Basil Twist’s Symphonie Fantastique, and Anthony Minghella’s Madama Butterfly (The Met). He is a proud member of the Barbershop Harmony Society, The Dramatists Guild, and AGMA.

Buddy even gets a little affection now and then.

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post Performer Perfectly Personifies a NYC Subway Rat first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

British Retailer John Lewis Asks That We Show a ‘Little Love’ to Others in Their Creative 2020 Christmas Advert

British department store John Lewis, who are known for their wonderfully creative annual Christmas adverts, partnered with Waitrose and Partners grocery in a heartwarming, multimedia holiday advert that is centered around an original song entitled “A Little Love”, and performed by Celeste, promoting kindness as its overall theme. Each vignette, whether real-life, stop-motion, or animated, shows how just a little bit of consideration and acceptance can help to go a long way.

We believe that the world would be a better place if we all gave a little more love. So this year we’re celebrating kindness, whether large or small, showing how each and every act of love has a positive impact on the world around us, as we pass them on to others.

This kindness also extends to those in the animal kingdom.

One small act of kindness sparks a heartfelt chain reaction – showing how powerful giving a little love can really be. Meet a host of lovable characters, including Mr. Pidge and Spikes the Hedgehog as they discover the true spirit of Christmas.

Christmas 2020 Ad Give a Little Love

The profits from the campaign benefit Fair Share UK, a non-profit that seeks to feed those in need.

Together with Waitrose & Partners we’re hoping to raise £4m for our charities plus £1m for local charities. FareShare helps those facing food poverty, and Home-Start, which works with parents who need support. The charities will use these donations to provide food, comfort, emotional support, and advice to families who need support this Christmas.

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post British Retailer John Lewis Asks That We Show a ‘Little Love’ to Others in Their Creative 2020 Christmas Advert first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source

Devoted Father Attempts to Deliver Daughter’s Letter to Santa in a Coca-Cola Christmas Ad by Taika Waititi

An incredibly touching Coca-Cola Christmas commercial, directed by the great Taika Waititi, features a devoted father who has to work at a remote location far away from home during the holidays. Before he leaves, his young daughter asks that he mails a letter to Santa Claus.

Coca-Cola Christmas Commercial

Unfortunately, the father misses the last post before the end of the year.

Last Post Christmas Ad

Not wanting to let his daughter down, the father travels to all ends of the Earth in order to personally deliver the letter but finds that even Santa is closed for the holiday. Luckily, a kind trucker gives the father a ride back to where he’s supposed to be.

This Christmas, give something only you can give. Be it in person, over an awkward video call, or just a quick message, making time for the ones you love is what makes Christmas truly the most special time of year, no matter how you do it.

Coca Cola Holiday Ad

Related Posts

Follow Laughing Squid on Facebook, Twitter, and Subscribe by Email.

The post Devoted Father Attempts to Deliver Daughter’s Letter to Santa in a Coca-Cola Christmas Ad by Taika Waititi first appeared on Laughing Squid.

Go to Source