The Grateful Dead Performs Live on ‘Playboy After Dark’ After Being Secretly Dosed With LSD in 1969

While in Los Angeles during January 1969, the members of the Grateful Dead performed two of their classic songs, “Mountains of the Moon” and “St. Stephen”, on the set of Playboy After Dark. Before the performance, Jerry Garcia bantered a bit with Hugh Hefner about the hippie scene in San Francisco and why the band had two drummers.

The punchline came when Hefner asked Garcia if the band would like to play.

Hugh Hefner: I wonder if we could get you to do a number for us?
Jerry: Absolutely not.

Here’s the audio track from the show.

Grateful Dead at Playboy After Dark

As it turns out, the band and several Playboy After Dark employees had been surreptitiously dosed with LSD after Owsley “Bear” Stanley added it to the coffee pot on set. Drummer Bill Kreutzmann shared this interesting fact while telling the story about the performance to Conan O’Brien in 2015.

This psychedelic mishap didn’t hamper Hef’s enthusiasm for the band, however, as he sent a thoughtful letter thanking them for the performance.

Hefner Letter to Grateful Dead

Here’s an abbreviated version of the performance.

via Live For Live Music

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Rael San Fratello’s Pink Teeter-Totters at the U.S.-Mexico Border Win Beazley Design of the Year

The three neon pink seesaws that slotted through the U.S.-Mexico border were just named the 2020 Beazley Design of the Year. Conceived by Oakland-based artists Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello (previously), the playful, subversive project was installed in July 2019 between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez and physically connected the two communities despite the 20-foot barrier. The prestigious, annual award comes from London’s Design Museum.

Rael and San Fratello spent a decade working on “Teeter-Totter Wall” before its installation at the border during a particularly divisive time under the Trump administration. Although it was in use for less than an hour, the interactive work intended to foster and display unity between children and adults from both countries as they physically lifted each other up. In response to the administration separating families at the border, Rael wrote about the project:

The teeter-totters represented the kind of balance necessary for any two people, two nations, to achieve equality, with the understanding that the actions on one side have direct consequences on the other. The teeter-totter is the physical manifestation of the Golden Rule—treat others as you would like others to treat you—a maxim that is shared by all cultures and religions. To experience joy on a teeter-totter, you must allow the other person to experience joy as well.

Among the other winners are a 3D rendering of SARS-CoV-2 by Alissa Eckert and Dan Higgins for the CDC and Social Design Collaborative’s “ModSkool,” a moveable building that can be easily assembled and taken down in response to evictions of farming communities in India. Check out all the top designs through the museum’s virtual exhibition that runs until March 28, and head to Rael San Fratello’s site and Instagram to see more of the duo’s socially minded projects.

 

 

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Imaginative Composite Photo Renderings That Merge Various Animals With Unlikely Environments

Digital artist Ted Chin has created a wonderful composite photo series that’s aptly entitled “Ted’s Little Dream” which features imaginatively surreal scenes in which animals of the sky, sea, and earth are paired with very unlikely environments. For example, a giant squid floats over a church steeple above San Francisco, a red fox mingles with fire in the forest, an angler fish grabs hold of a line dangling from the moon, an enormous octopus waits underneath a lonely house, and an iguana becomes one with an evergreen forest, just to name a few.

I find it easier to tell my stories with images rather than words. By using my imagination and photography/photoshop skills, it becomes my passion to recreate and share my surreal fantasy with the world.

I place it into a lifetime project – “Ted’s Little Dream”

via Colossal

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A Vanity Supercut of the Name ‘David’ in Film and TV

Photographer and filmmaker David Friedman (previously) created a “vanity supercut” of his first name by gathering a number of different utterances of the name “David” as seen in various films and television series and compiling them all into one convenient video that he featured in his newsletter Ironic Sans.

Being named David means you hear your name on TV all the time. You hear it at the movies. It doesn’t seem to go out of fashion. So I decided to gather a bunch of Davids and bring them together in one video.

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A Coughing Toy Bunny Who Keeps Ripping Out Her Stitches Searches For a Cure in a Touching Animation

“Unbreakable”, created by Roof Studio for INSMED, is a touching animation about a toy bunny named Barbara who comes off the assembly line coughing, wheezing, and popping her stitches. The toy factory rejects her and puts her out into the street. A determined Barbara, however, visits every shop in town looking for a possible remedy that would make her whole again. Sadly, nothing seems to work. It’s only when she follows a line of pink yarn around town that she finally finds someone who lovingly takes her in and takes care of her.

She goes from shop to shop to no avail, until she discovers a loose string of yarn that takes her on a magical journey across town and into the arms of a toy repair shop owner.

The story was inspired by a woman who went to four different doctors before she was diagnosed with NTM lung disease.

via Vimeo Staff Picks

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Fascinating Slow Motion Macro Footage of a Whirling Ultrasonic Homogenizer Used on a Variety of Items

In a swirling episode of The Slow Mo Guys (previously), host Gavin Free put a portable ultrasonic homogenizer stick, which runs at an astonishing 30,000hz, to use on variety of objects, each with a different texture and purpose. In order to capture the results in slow motion, macro footage, Free used an ultra-high speed Phantom V2511, which was able capture the images at 170,000 frames per second.

When it really comes down to it, in this video Gav is filming a vibrating stick in slow mo. However, not all sticks vibrate. Especially not as fast as this one.

Ultrasonic Homogenizer

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How the Current Borders of London Were Determined

As part of his “Unfinished London” series, comedian Jay Foreman (previously) takes a humorous look at the current borders of greater metropolitan London, all of which were set in 1965. Foreman further explains how the borders came to be, what changes were made to previous borders, the different advantages of both being and not being considered a Londoner.

London may have stopped physically sprawling outwards when the Green Belt was introduced in the 30s, but the capital’s influence is still very expanding indeed. People are now commuting into London from further than ever before as they seek cheaper housing. Shouldn’t these people have a say in how the city they depend on is run?

Where does London stop

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Duplicate Limbs and Unusual Mashups Revitalize Vintage Ceramic Creatures by Artist Debra Broz

All images courtesy of Paradigm Gallery

Simultaneously adorable and bizarre, Debra Broz’s porcelain creatures breathe new life into antique knick-knacks. The Los Angeles-based artist (previously) carefully gathers discarded figurines that she separates and reassembles into humorous and unusual sculptures: an entire flock of ducklings balances on just two feet, a hooved cat carries its equine baby, and tree branches sprout from a lounging ballerina.

Broz’s hybrid animals are included in Salvage, a group exhibition curated by Colossal’s Founder and Editor-in-Chief Christopher Jobson at Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia. Through the work of three artists and pieces from the Recycled Artist in Residency Program, Salvage examines how artists are revitalizing fragments of tradition and culture that were destined to be lost, relegated to the periphery, or buried forever. The show opens on January 22 with a live talk with Jobson, Broz, and artists Yurim Gough and André Schulze—tickets are available on Eventbrite—and runs through February 20.

 


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A Tiled Wave Ripples Across Olafur Eliasson’s New Installation in Downtown Chicago

“Atmospheric wave wall” (2021), 30 x 60 feet. All images courtesy of CNL Projects, shared with permission

Last week, artist Olafur Eliasson (previously) unveiled a massive, wave-like artwork that mimics the rippled surfaces of the Chicago River and Lake Michigan. Comprised of 1,963 curved tiles, “Atmospheric wave wall” sits between the two bodies of water at Willis Tower and shifts in appearance based on the sunlight, time of year, and position of the viewer. It’s the Danish-Icelandic artist’s first public project, which was curated by CNL Projects and commissioned by EQ Office, in Chicago.

Speckled with orange pieces, the blue-and-green motif is constructed with powder-coated steel and based on Penrose tiling, a design with fivefold symmetry, which fills the undulating border. At night, a light shines through the street-side work, emitting a glow through the tile seams and further altering the appearance of the textured facade. Eliasson says about the work:

Inspired by the unpredictable weather that I witnessed stirring up the surface of Lake Michigan, ‘Atmospheric wave wall’ appears to change according to your position and to the time of day and year. What we see depends on our point of view: understanding this is an important step toward realizing that we can change reality.

Follow Eliasson’s latest projects on his studio’s site and Instagram.

 




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Albula Pro Font Family

Albula Pro, a modern sans serif font family from Serpentype.

Created by Swiss type designer Silvio Meier of foundry Serpentype, Albula Pro is a modern and functional sans serif font family inspired by geometry and simple graphics. Equipped with some unique details, the shapes of all letters have been optically corrected in order to ensure much better readability. Wher print or web, the Albula Pro font family performs perfectly in headlines and all kinds of branding projects. To learn more about this great font family, just click on the following link or have a look at the images below. By the way, the complete is currently available as a heavily discounted introductory offer (only for a very limited time).

Albula Pro Font
Albula Pro Font

You can find many more recommended typefaces in our extensive Fonts category. The section includes a wide range of typefaces made for different typographic needs.

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