Mixed Media Works by Gregory Euclide Expose the Destructive Materials Used to Replicate Landscapes

"Birch," all images provided by Hashimoto Contemporary

“Birch,” all images provided by Hashimoto Contemporary

The textured paintings and assemblages of artist Gregory Euclide (previously) combine organic and man-made materials to present the rapid changes happening to the landscapes around us. In his upcoming solo exhibition Preservation Paradox at Hashimoto Contemporary the Minneapolis-based artist examines the contradictions found in our simultaneous desire to protect some areas of nature while destroying others. The exhibition includes pieces from his most recent series Scrapes. The abstracted landscapes include some of the toxic materials used to create common artworks, such as paint and styrofoam.

“Acrylic paint, a petroleum product, is used to generate the illusion of land or water when in a pile or scraped across the surface, as well as thinned out and used to generate the illusion of landscape,” the artist explains in a press release for his exhibition.

His pieces include large swaths of paint set on top more traditionally painted landscapes, exploring both the landscape and the material that was used to replicate it. Preservation Paradox opens on September 8 and runs through September 29, 2018 at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Fransisco. You can explore more of Euclide’s recent work on Instagram and Behance.

"Bridge"

“Bridge”

"Scrape 12"

“Scrape 12”

"Scrape 1"

“Scrape 1”

"Scrape 5"

“Scrape 5”

"Scrape 11"

“Scrape 11”

"Yard"

“Yard”


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“No Blue Without Yellow” by Artist Maciek Janicki

Maciek Janicki (previously featured here).

His latest short film is titled No Blue Without Yellow, in which he utilized sampled paintings, following consequential times in Vincent Van Gogh’s life, to sculpt a 3-D version of the world Van Gogh lived. This short film will be released in partnership with the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maciek Janicki’s Website

Maciek Janicki on Instagram


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Illustrator Spotlight: Carson Ting


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Branding, Packaging, and Graphic design by Fagerström for unPacked

Brand development by studio fagerström for unPacked—the first zero-waste supermarket in Madrid, Spain.

In 2018, design studio fagerström was commissioned to develop a suitable brand identity and packaging system for unPacked—Madrid’s first zero-waste supermarket. The sustainable store mainly offers groceries and hygiene products. Their brand name is based on the concept ‘without packaging’ since most of the products in the store are sold in bulk. The current movement of zero waste has its roots in the traditional way of selling and buying groceries as well as the increasing social concern for our environment.

“unPacked seeks to promote the reduction of the use of plastics and the generation of waste, promoting healthy, proximity and accessible food & products.”

Below you can find a few images of the restrained brand identity. For more of studio fagerström’s eye-catching work, please visit their website or have a look at the portfolio on Behance.

Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
The brand guidelines for unPacked.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
Only natural materials have been used for the printed collateral.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
A clean and modern packaging design.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
The eco-friendly paper-bag.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
The signage outside the store.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.
Branding, graphic design, and packaging by fagerström for unPacked.

All images © by design studio fagerström. Feel free to have a look at our Graphic Design, Branding, and Packaging Design categories to find other inspiring projects.

The post Branding, Packaging, and Graphic design by Fagerström for unPacked appeared first on WE AND THE COLOR.


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ENOUGH: Humorous Stop Motion Film Examines Our Inner Desire to Lose Control

Swedish director and animator Anna Mantzaris has a penchant for the darkly humous as seen in her 2012 film But Milk is Important. Her recent short ENOUGH was made during her first year at the Royal College of Art where she graduated earlier this year. The stop motion film follows several kind-looking characters as they snap during everyday occurrences such as frustrating board meetings, dealing with demanding customers, or just narrowly missing the bus.

“I wanted to have quite soft and sympathetic characters, to contrast with the less soft actions,”Mantzaris explained to Directors Notes. “I also liked them to feel a bit awkward and uncomfortable, just as we can feel sometimes in social situations. I also wanted it to feel a bit grey and boring, to enhance the feeling of an everyday life that we sometimes want to break out from.”

The funny animation is a cathartic release of the darkness we carry bottled up inside, and showcases what might happen if you finally let yourself lose control. The London-based director recently worked on Wes Anderson’s film Isle of Dogs and has won several awards for her films including the Walt Disney Award for Best Graduation Film and the Audience Award at Ottawa International Animation Festival. You can see more of her short films on her website and Vimeo. (via Short of the Week)


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Recently Digitized Journals Grant Visitors Access to Leonardo da Vinci’s Detailed Engineering Schematics and Musings

Codex Forster II , Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II , Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London recently published scans of two of the Leonardo da Vinci notebooks so website visitors can digitally zoom and flip through the drawings and musings of the Italian Renaissance painter, architect, inventor, and sculptor. Jumbled together in the delicate journals are thoughts on both science and art—detailed charts and speculations contained on the same pages as observational sketches of hats or horse hooves.

Da Vinci is believed to have started recording his thoughts in notebooks during the 1480s while he was a military and naval engineer for the Duke of Milan. The writing included in the notebooks was produced in 16th-century Italian “mirror-writing,” which one reads right to left. Scholars have debated the reasoning behind this style, believing it was either a way to code his thoughts, or simply make writing easier as a left-handed artist. “Writing masters at the time would have made demonstrations of mirror-writing, and his letter-shapes are in fact quite ordinary: he used the kind of script that his father, a legal notary, would have used,” an article on the V&A’s website explains. “It is possible to decipher Leonardo’s curious mirror-writing, once the eye has become accustomed to the style.”

The collective title for the five notebooks in the V&A’s collection is the Forster Codices. This digitized set contains his earliest (1487-90, Milan) and latest (1505, Florence) notebooks in the museum’s collection. The name for the journals comes from John Forster who bequeathed the valuable works to the museum in 1876. The V&A plans to digitize the three other notebooks found in the two volumes Codex Forster II and III, for the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death in 2019. You can learn more about the series of notebooks in the collection on the V&A’s website. (via Boing Boing)

Codex Forster II (page 10 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 10 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 123 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/II. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 123 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/II. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster III (page 23 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/III. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster III (page 23 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/III. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 75 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 75 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 91 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/II. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster II (page 91 verso), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141/II. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster III (page 9 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Codex Forster III (page 9 recto), Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. Forster MS.141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Three Volumes of Codex Forster, Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Three Volumes of Codex Forster, Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th – early 16th century, Italy. Museum no. MSL/1876/Forster/141. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London


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Member Spotlight: An Interview with Artist Hanna Lee Joshi


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Logo and Badge Templates from GraphicBurger

Get some stylish templates of logos and vintage inspired badges for Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Raul Taciu of GraphicBurger has created this set of 10 well designed logo and badge templates. Included as both AI and PSD files, you can use this set of fully editable vector graphics for diverse branding projects, authentic labels, apparel design, typographic work, and much more. Please note, the files require Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator. You can get their latest version from the Adobe Creative Cloud website, just check it out here. The collection is available for low budget on Creative Market, just click on the following link.

Feel free to download the set here.

Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.
Graphics for Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

This is what you get.

The set includes 10 high quality logo and badge templates for Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. Thanks to the use of vector graphics, everything is fully editable. Only free fonts have been used. Download links are provided in the Fonts.pdf file. The graphics are well organized using layers, groups, and folders. All textures used for the presentations are available for free download. For those who want to purchase this amazing collection, just follow the link below.

You can get the set on Creative Market.

Fully editable vector graphics.
Fully editable vector graphics.
Only free fonts were used.
Only free fonts were used.
Well organized layers, groups and folders.
Well organized layers, groups and folders.
Create stylish logos, logotypes, and vintage badges.
Create stylish logos, logotypes, and vintage badges in no time.

Feel free to purchase the set for low budget on Creative Market.

Find more graphic resources in our popular Templates category.

The post Logo and Badge Templates from GraphicBurger appeared first on WE AND THE COLOR.


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365 Days of Miniature Cut Paper Egrets, Sparrows, Pelicans and Other Birds

Ruby Throated Hummingbird

India-based cut paper artists Nayan Shrimali and Vaishali Chudasama have set out to construct 365 miniature bird species by the end of 2018. To form each work, the pair begins by cutting feathers, beaks, and talons from layers of paper and then using watercolor to produce further detail. Despite the works’ small size (some of the tiniest pieces measuring only 3/4 of an inch from head to tail), each bird takes four to six hours to finish depending on the extent of the bird’s colorful plumage. You can stay updated with the artists’ miniature project on Instagram, and buy tiny avian artworks by the duo on their Etsy Shop.

Snowy Egret

Snowy Egret

Raven

Raven

Baya Weaver Bird

Baya Weaver Bird

Bali Myna

Bali Myna

Indian Peafowl

Indian Peafowl

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

Griffon Vulture

Griffon Vulture

Darter

Darter


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Sliced Footwear Arranged in Uncanny Configurations by Sakir Gokcebag

Turkish-born visual artist Şakir Gökçebağ (previously) deconstructs everyday objects, often eradicating their original functionality in order to form humorous installations. His works are created from items one might find around the house such as hula hoops, brooms, toilet paper rolls, and pairs of worn shoes. The later series of altered footwear spans more than 15 years, and has been installed in surreal arrangements both inside and out of the gallery.

For these pieces Gökçebağ chops the front toe off of neutral-toned work boots and other sturdy footwear. He then arranges the pieces in circles, rows, and parallel lines that split elevated platforms. The installations appear digitally composed, and playing a trick on the viewer as they attempt to decode the visual manipulation. Gökçebağ has lived and worked in Hamburg, Germany since 2001. You can see more of his oddly arranged objects, like this belt that has been sliced and folded to appear like a ribbon, on his Instagram.

 

 


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